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  1. Soumya Sankar Bose’s Where the Birds Never Sing (2017 ongoing) is a body of work on the Marichjhapi massacre, the forcible eviction in 1979 of Bangladeshi refugees on Marichjhapi Island in Sundarban, West Bengal, and the subsequent death of thousands by police gunfire, starvation, and disease. 

     After the partition of Bengal in 1947 many Hindu Bengalis who fled East Pakistan were aggressively sent to the infertile, inhospitable land of Central India. In 1977, the Left Front government came to power promising their refugee supporters to settle in West Bengal and they subsequently moved to Marichjhapi Island. But the government reneged on its promise, fearing that an influx of refugees might jeopardise the prospects of the state’s economic recovery,  and started to forcibly send them back to Central India. Finally, on January 31,1979 Police forcefully entered the Island and opened fire.


    Thousands of refugees seeking their final home stayed in Marichjhapi, for the next year and a half.  It is close to impossible to trace the precise number of people that died in process during the exodus from central Indian camps to settlement in Marichjhapi, and the eventual police eviction drive sending them back to the camps. 

    Bose, over the last two years, has been researching and re-enacting some memories of the survivors in specific locations, as there is very little written record of the incident. Through the intricate weaving of facts and fiction of existing oral histories of the real survivors, he brings to light several perspectives of the same narrative, forming a cryptic framework of this problematic history that is facing slow erasure from the memory of peoplepastedGraphic.png